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Chroma: Photographs of cities by Ben Thomas bursting with primary colours and light

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With a focus on primary colours and a strong use of light, Chroma is an ongoing series by Australian photographer, Ben Thomas, that continues to pose the question of how society defines the places in which we live.

Featured previously, Ben's latest work centres around deconstructing cities and urban spaces with a focus on the use of colour and flatness. It follows his internationally acclaimed Cityshrinker series, which was considered to be one of the pioneering projects exploring the now popular tilt-shift technique.

From days at the funfair to famous street corners in New York, Sydney, Dubai, Paris and Hong Kong, Ben looks for the "architecture and place design that give cities their unique feel. A key factor was also the weather, which was critical for the treatment process."

Ben is a winner of the Hasselblad Masters 2018 and has recently completed campaigns and assignments for The New Yorker Magazine, Sony, Cake, Singapore Airlines, Penguin Books and Chronicle Books. Discover more at benthomas.co or follow him on Instagram @___benthomas.

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darthduckie
7 hours ago
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Some of these look like Pittsburgh
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Morris Arboretum in Flourtown, Pennsylvania

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Swan Pond.

The Morris Arboretum is a relatively little-known gem among Pennsylvania’s many gardens. It’s a beautiful, verdant oasis boasting a swan pond, fountains, gardens, and the only surviving free-standing Victorian fernery in North America.

The fernery, constructed in 1899, houses several hundred ferns and club mosses in a peaceful setting. A Buddha sculpture, reflecting pools full of koi, and waterfalls add an extra sense of serenity. The Fernery attests to the Victorian love of exotic and tropical plants.

The whole arboretum is also one of the best surviving examples of Victorian Eclecticism, a style that basically mashed diverse types of gardening styles all together. Trees selected from the Far East such as maples and cherries cover the English Park, while dawn redwoods cover an area by the rustic log cabin. There’s also a classical Roman-style temple and grotto. Several rose varieties fill up the Rose Garden and two resident swans live in the Swan Pond.

The gardens also have 17 state champion trees of Pennsylvania, several of which are many centuries old. The model railway that includes immaculate models of Philadelphia landmarks made out of natural materials like bark, pinecones, and resin is another highlight, as is the sculpture garden.

John and Lydia Morris, a brother-sister duo, created the Morris Arboretum. Now the gardens, in addition to being the state arboretum of Pennsylvania, belong to the University of Pennsylvania and have been open to the public since 1931.

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darthduckie
15 hours ago
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Edward Mooney House in New York, New York

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Edward Mooney House.

The Edward Mooney House, located in the heart of Chinatown, is considered the oldest surviving row house in New York City. Its long, storied history is just as colorful as its eye-catching red exterior.

The house was built sometime between 1785 and 1789 on land previously owned by British Loyalist James Delancey. After the Revolution, his land was seized and bought at auction by a wealthy butcher named Edward Mooney, who had the house built and lived there until his death in 1800.

Since then, the building has housed an eclectic mix of tenants including a tavern, brothel, general store, hotel, restaurant, pool room, and a Chinese club. Most notoriously, however, was its stint as Barney Flynn’s Saloon, a popular hangout for sporting men, gang members, and political hacks in the early 1900s.

The saloon was also the headquarters of Chuck Connors, a local celebrity nicknamed the “Mayor of Chinatown” for his slumming tours of the neighborhood. Unlike the crowded “haywagons” or “rubberneck wagons” that descended in droves from Times Square, Connors led private tours, which catered to the likes of Sir Thomas Lipton, Henry Irving, Anna Held, and members of German and Swedish royalty.

In the late 19th century, Chinatown had its fair share of debauchery, but so did a lot of neighborhoods. The situation was grossly exaggerated by the city’s newspapers, who employed racist caricatures to sell copy. As a result, tourists had biased expectations of the neighborhood, which tour guides were happy to fulfill.

In addition to the usual trips to local temples and chop suey restaurants, Connors would bring his clients to one of Chinatown’s most infamous opium dens—or at least that’s what they were led to believe. In reality, it was only an apartment populated by paid actors that pretended to be addicts and prostitutes.

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darthduckie
1 day ago
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The Strange Beauty Of Brutalist Architecture, Mid-Demolition

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A new exhibition collects stark photos of important architecture as it’s being razed–a phenomenon that’s as wasteful as it is heartbreaking.

The average age of a building being demolished in the 1950s was 111 years, according to urban economist Richard Barras’s book, Building Cycles. By the early 2000s, the age was down to 60 years. That number seems to still be dropping: another study pegged the age of some demolished buildings at less than 50 years. Today, we treat buildings a lot like the way we treats smartphones or clothing: as products that need to be replaced regularly, whether because they’re unfashionable or unsuitable. Demolition is now a genre of satisfying aesthetic content unto itself, like ASMR or slime videos. “The Top 10 Demolitions Gone Wrong” has 25 million views on YouTube.

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darthduckie
1 day ago
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Relationship advice from the cat

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Cheezburger Image 9151670016

LoL by: jennybookseller

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darthduckie
2 days ago
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If you really cared...

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Cheezburger Image 9151199744

LoL by: Chris10a

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darthduckie
2 days ago
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